How to Become a Successful Distributor in the FMCG Sector

The Fast Moving Consumer Goods or the FMCG sector is a place where goods are sold at a relatively low price and includes products which sell out much quicker than other products. They mostly keep perishable items as opposed to durable items. For example, packaged foods, beverages, toiletries, over-the-counter drugs etc.; whereas durable items include kitchen appliances, textiles, items which can be used for many years. FMCG goods mainly compose of items which have low shelf life. Because it includes items which are required by masses in their daily lifestyle and because this sector has a huge demand, it is essential that this sector divides it work amongst various other short segments. The major segments in the FMCG sector are Manufacturer – Packaging – Sales and Distributorship – Retailer/Wholesaler.A distributor is someone who will ensure that all your products reach the right people. Whether it is business to business or business to personal. In any emerging market, as demand for a product increases, so does the need for distributors. From everyday use items like cooking oil, packaged foods like biscuits, snacks and everything else with an expiry date, every new trend which comes up as a team of dedicated distributors hard at work to find quality manufacturers and help them bring their product to retail.Steps to follow to become a Distributor:

Decide what type of distribution business you will run: Distributors can be split into two categories based on who they serve. The first category is, retail distributors buy from wholesalers or manufacturers and sell products directly to consumers. The second Category is, wholesale merchant distributors buy from manufacturers and resell the products to retailers or other distributors. You need to decide which type suits you best and work upon that.

Decide what you would like to distribute: You could focus on a specific product or offer a variety of items. You could base your decisions on a product about which you may feel passionately or any product which you think is not available much in the market. While many large companies are served by equally large distributors, these distributors are unwilling or unable to serve smaller, more specialized business.

Estimate your start-up costs: In addition to a business plan, you will also need some idea of how much money it will take to get your business up and running. As a distributor, your major area of expense will be your inventory. This means that your start-up costs will go parallel as to what product or products you choose to sell. If you are selling a single product then the pricing will depend on how many retailers you are targeting.

Figure out how to sell your products: This will depend largely on who your customers are and what type of products you’re selling. In any case, you have to chalk down specific goals on what methods you can adapt to sell your goods. One of the best ways to do so is to connect more and more with the manufacturers as well as the Retailer/Wholesalers. The more connections you build, the better opportunities you get. This can mean anything from advertising to personal meetings with store owners to search-engine optimization (SEO).

Form your company legally: You’ll have to legally create the company before you can do business. Check with your state regulations and see if you need to create an operating agreement or another type of founding document. Gather any business partners you have for this venture and have them sign any legal documents you fill out

Make your business licensed and registered: You will have to register your business with the correct places or business association as and when required. Your company should be listed in the legal list of companies. Other legal steps may be required to get your business started.

Contact manufacturers or wholesalers of your products: You will need to find sources from which you will buy your product. To locate manufacturers and wholesalers, you will need to build Relationships and connections which will help you to define your work. Networking is the foundation of the distribution industry. You must gain a deep understanding of your target market and clients to develop stronger partnerships. Keep communication open and available.

Purchase inventory: Once you’ve found a source for product, it’s time to place your first order. You’ll need to purchase however much inventory you need. Keeping in mind the budgetary and space constraints you will also need to buy products pertaining to the limit of your users. This is especially true of products with a short shelf-life or FMCG goods. Also, consider the logistics you will require to distribute your goods.

Find a location for your business: The size of the space you need to hold your inventory will be determined by the size of your product and your delivery method. You should consider starting off small as your business builds a reputation. As your business grows, you can move into larger facilities that can accommodate your inventory needs.

Create a website for your business: Creating a customer friendly website is essential in today’s business model. The website should describe prices and product offerings. This is especially important if you sell directly to consumers. You can also invest in search engine optimization (SEO) that directs potential customers directly to your website by placing it higher in search engine results.

Market your product to potential customers. Send out your catalogue to potential customers in your area. The tools of marketing that you can find in today’s digitally marketed world are immense and of huge influence.

The distributorship business is very lucrative. To become a distributor in the FMCG sector, you must have an eye for spotting trends in their industry, as well as with building relationships with manufacturers and retailers. If you’re interested in becoming a distributor for the FMCG sector, you need to follow the FMCG model.

Six Myths of Effective Communication

Communication Process or Effective Communication or Communication Skills are such subjects that has been properly researched and many authors have filled volumes of pages to explain all the nitty-gritty involved in communication and to explain to the world how one can and must communicate with others or group of people. A simple Google search for “Effective Communication” generates 44 million pages. Yet, I believe that the communication process as a whole is governed by certain myths and misnomer. We are preparing this write-up to touch upon some of those myths and provide clarity.

1) Language is critical for effective communication process – In India; we speak more than 18 recognized languages. Have you ever wondered how does a Kashmiri local communicate with his fellow citizen from Southern part of India or our Marathi Maanus (local from Maharastra) communicate with other country men from Eastern India? They don’t use common language to communicate with one another or to express their thoughts. Yet, they communicate effectively, if not efficiently. Your ability to read, write and speak any particular language or list of languages comprises only 10% of communication process and the balance of 90% of communication process consists of your body-language, facial expressions, message, context, complexity or simplicity of the message (words, terminologies, and jargons used in the message), listening, perceiving, interpreting and giving feedback. How efficient or inefficient you are during the 90% of the communication processes makes the overall communication process either effective or ineffective.

2) Effective communication means your ability to communicate in English Language – Do you know how does the Premier’s of world’s top three economies (President of China Hu Jintao; Prime Minister of Japan Yukio Hatoyama and President of USA Barack Obama) communicate with one another on world forum? Mr. Hu Jintao and Mr. Yukio Hatoyama have very limited understanding of English language and Mr. Barack Obama is not known for his proficiency in Chinese or Japanese language. It is an irony for our generation to use “effective communication” and “proficiency in English language” as synonym. You cannot make a defense by saying that the English is a widely used language for communication, because it is not. Chinese is the widely used [add language] for communication purposes, followed by Spanish at number two and English at number three. It is also interesting to note that the number of people that use Chinese for communication outnumbers the total number of people that uses Spanish and English combined. There are many prominent people, head of states, historians, and other celebrities who are very effective and influential in their native language, be it French, Italian, Hindi, Arabic or any other language, but they are not good with English language. Does this mean that they are not effective communicators or they have deficiency in their communication? English is not the only language used for communication but is one among many other languages used for the purpose.

3) Ability to write and speak proficiently qualifies you as an excellent communicator – If you write well in any language then you can become a writer and if you speak well in any language then you can become a good speaker or orator but that doesn’t qualify as an excellent communicator. What will you do with your ability to write flawlessly and speak fluently when whatever you write is a piece of irrelevant nonsense and whatever you speak is senseless rubbish? Communication is not just about speaking and writing. It is about understanding the message, context of the message and time of communication.

4) What you communicate is not as important as how you communicate – There is a difference between being a communicator and being a spokesperson and the key difference is related to the ownership of the message. When you communicate, you know what you are communicating, you take-up the responsibility and you also provide clarification, if required. Subject matter expertise is important. Verifying your facts and figures is important. Taking up the ownership is critical. When you are a spokesperson, you pass-on the message prepared by others and are not in a position to provide any clarification and enhancement.

5) People holding command over two different languages cannot communicate efficiently – Language is one of the modes to communicate and fortunately, it is not the only way. While communicating, your message, body-language, facial expression and confidence level, should sync to make it an effective communication. Recently, I went to a laundry shop to check the cost. I can communicate in three languages but the shop-owner didn’t know any of those three. Yet, we communicated, verified our message, gave feedback to one another and gave acknowledgement of acceptance of message. Communication across languages and cultures is possible, provided we minimize our self-constructed hurdles. If I decide to not to understand or accept the message then doesn’t matter what language or mode of communication the other person uses, I will never understand. It has a lot to do with the willingness and desire of both the parties involved in communication process.

6) “No communication” is good communication – In our personal life as well as in work-life we ignore or curtail many requests for communication. We assume that it is good to not respond to a particular message. We hold the information which is meant to be passed-on to people up or down the hierarchy. “No response” or “No communication” or “No feedback” is not considered as good communication but this in turn strangles and complicates many workplaces as well as family relations that actually require frequent exchange of messages for its very existence.

Key elements required for effective communication

1) Know what you are communicating – Knowing what you are communicating is very critical. While communicating, one must correlate his or her own thought process with that of the sensibility of an individual or group of people that they are communicating with. Communication is not a onetime process but involves many to and fro motions and rounds of clarifications, and feedback and hence subject matter expertise is crucial. If you fail to provide the required clarification then you may risk losing your credibility as a communicator.

2) Know the size and composition of people that you are communicating with – It is important to know the composition, size of group (One-to-one or One-to-many or Many-to-one) and cultural background of your audience and based on that you may be required to either level-up or level-down your communication style. If you couldn’t level-up or level-down your communication style based on the need then either you will be considered as incompetent or an idiot.

3) Credibility, Sincerity and Trustworthiness – Do you walk your talk? Are you a reliable and serious communicator or are you an entertainer or publicity seeker? How honest are you in your communication? Are you a habitual liar? Are you authorized to communicate or are you the right person to communicate on the subject or matter that you are discussing or debating about? What’s been your background? All these affect your communication process and your credentials as a communicator.

4) Time of communication – Delay in communication or communicating the wrong message at right time is as good as receiving no communication at all. For example, you could have saved your relation or you could have retained one of your high-performer or you could have brought onboard a very talented candidate but you missed it because you mistimed your communication. There is a right time for every communication to be passed on and for every discussion but unfortunately, the right time is not when you decide it to be right. Just as depicted in one joke between a doctor and a patient.

Doctor: I have good news and a bad news to communicate to you.
Doctor: Good news is that we have been able to prolong the life of your father by one day and the bad news is that I forgot to communicate this to you yesterday.
Good communicator knows the right time to communicate.

5) Precise and simple – Complexity and Longevity of Communication Process kills the essence and effectiveness of the message. Message needs to be simple, straight and accurate. At this point, I remember one of my Department Head. When asked to provide highlights or summary of a concept, he sends across a document of 75-100 pages and of which 99% of text and data would be irrelevant.

6) Feedback – Feedback is very important as it ensures that the message has been understood and accepted in the manner it should have been and that there is no conflict of understanding between the sender and the receiver.

Things to avoid

There are few things that one must avoid to ensure effective communication.

1) Assumptions – There are further two issues that are related to assumptions.
a) Communication between sender (s) and receiver (s) should not have any space for ambiguity. Message must be clearly stated and understood by both the parties and should not be left anything on fancy assumptions. Any such assumption can be fatal for the execution or follow-up of the message.
b) In a relationship between boss and subordinates, among team-members, between employer (or representative of employer) and between any two people that share emotional proximity, mis-communication or lack of communication or misrepresentation in communication leads to assumptions, and gives space for gossip and rumors which in turn distorts the relation, trust and reliability.

2) Common Lingo – In group communication, it is critical to communicate in a language that is understood by everybody else in the group to avoid any conflict of interest, to ensure fairness and transparency. Setting-up a common lingo with one or two or a set of people within a group, which in a way eliminate others from the communication process and make them look embarrassing, not only shows you as disgraceful, disrespectful, scandalous, and despicable but also put questions on your credibility, honesty and communication skills. I was staying with one couple and to keep me out of their discussion, they used to communicate, not privately but right in front of me, in a language that they thought I cannot understand or conversant in. Least did they know that not only I could pick-up few words in that language but their tone and body-language was loud and clear enough to pass on the message. In a group situation, such things need to be avoided or else these put us in an awkward and embarrassing situation.

Conclusion

Tell us what you are going to tell us, tell us, and then tell us what you told us; that is the essence of communication process. Good communication requires clarity of thought, precision of language and empathy with your intended audience. People will interpret your message differently based on their level of education, past experience, familiarity with the topic, fluency in your language, etc. A good communicator has his audience’s best interests at heart. They concentrate on the message, not themselves.

We do not talk TO people, we talk WITH people.

We welcome your comments and feedback because that’s been very crucial for us. Feel free to contact us for any clarification or professional assistance.

Have a great day and take good care of yourself.

6 Steps to the Social Aspects of Sustainable Communities Planning

Successful sustainable communities planning can be divided into two categories: physical sustainability and social sustainability. Information on the former (physical sustainability) is readily available but what about the equally important social aspects of building an off the grid eco village? Once energy self-sustainability, food self-sustainability, and structure self-sustainability (home building) is covered, how do you assure that the people in your community will want to stay, and new people will want to join, both of which are foundations of sustainable community growth?

I have identified 6 key components to the social sustainability aspect of community building: decentralized government, individual freedom, recreation, entrepreneurial model for financial independence, group living activities, and an outreach program. It should be noted that A) these are all equally important and B) the importance of each of these increases the more community is emphasized in your eco village; meaning people living together and coexisting rather than just living in the same location and existing.

Decentralized Government:

The definitive work I have read on this point, and recommended for anyone starting a community, would be M. Scott Peck’s book, “The Different Drum: Community Making and Peace.” A summary of why decentralized government, and more specifically decision-making through consensus, is important is three-fold: it builds a community of leaders, it supports equality and fairness assuring everyone is part of major decision-making, and it requires communication and thoughtful interaction.

Each of these three points is important to the long-term social sustainability of a community because they all empower people and keep communication lines open. Lack of communication and people feeling ‘lost in the shuffle’ or insignificant to the creation are arguably the two largest undermining factors of community building, and not just sustainable communities but at work, home, and in people’s families. Nobody likes to feel like their views and needs are going unheard and nobody likes to feel like they aren’t important; the solution is governing by consensus and a decentralized power structure that I’ll cover more in detail in a future article.

Individual Freedom:

Individual Freedom is ESSENTIAL to the growth and sustainability of a community. This seems obvious but my personal opinion is that society as a whole is really missing the boat in this department and the number one reason for people to want to start a new life in an off the grid community, even more important than all the ethical reasons for sustainability, should be freedom.

Individual freedom means being able to dress, think, say, and do what you want as long as it doesn’t harm anyone else. If people want to cross-dress, meditate on their head, smoke pot, and worship the Chicken God they should be able to do so in the privacy of their own home without worrying about repercussions OR JUDGMENT. Start your community with this level of freedom in mind and a consensus governing structure will keep it that way and help expand the paradigm of everyone involved.

Recreation

Recreation is about making your community fun. Your community could be the most off the grid super self-sustainable living environment on the planet, but if it is a boring place to be who would want to live or visit it? The solution is building recreation into your daily living structure and involving the entire community. Things like live music, movie nights, mediation or yoga classes, community construction projects, food production, etc. can all function as recreational activities that help bring people together and keep them together.

True sustainable growth of your community comes from making it a place people want to be all the time. If everyone living in your community wants to get away to have fun then you have failed in your mission to create a truly sustainable environment and you should sit down with all of your members and discuss how to fix it. Success in this area will not only guarantee people will want to stay in your community but it will also keep friends, family and new members coming to you rather than you seeking them.

Entrepreneurial Model for Financial Independence

By “entrepreneurial model” and “independence” I do not mean a community model but an INDIVIDUAL MODEL. A self-sustainable community is by definition financially independent but an individual model for financial independence should also be available to those members that desire more than just ‘retiring’ to a community without the possibility of anything else.

The way we are doing this is by pooling the resources of our community and creating businesses (see also Outreach Program below). Any time a new person is considered for community membership we evaluate potential business opportunities they may bring and work with that person, if they are interested, to create residual income streams that benefit both the individual and the community.

By doing this we create more individual freedom and provide opportunity to build a business and still leave room for people that might want to try community living but aren’t sure they would want to stay long-term. This benefits both them because of the resources and capital we can provide, and us because businesses we help to build still pay a small percentage to the community that helped create them even if the business owner decides to move on.

Group Living Activities

Group living activities are things like group dining, child care, educational classes, laundry, etc.; anything that might be a part of traditional living that can be performed more efficiently by the cooperative effort of the community. These are separate from the recreation activities I mentioned above but they can overlap as there is no reason activities like dining can’t also be structured as recreational activities.

The real key is providing benefit exclusive to the community living experience and maintaining the community ‘energy.’ What this means is that people living in your community should easily be able to tout the extensive time and energy-saving benefits of community living; rather than complain about how exhausting it is dealing with so many people so close. Work together to see what can be streamlined for the benefit of everyone and keep discussion open about how to improve any systems in place. Most domestic duty activities can be performed more efficiently and more enjoyably for an entire community of 80-100 people by a rotating group of two or three individuals; this saves time, money, resources, and should garner the appreciation and support of everyone involved.

Combining group living activities also keeps the energy of the community communal; the goal is for your community to feel and operate like a close-knit family. Family energy, however, requires all of the previous four points. If you look at family models that do, versus don’t, work you will see that successful families maintain each of the listed social points: A) a balance of power where everyone is heard and respected B) freedom where everyone feels comfortable being who they are C) social activities that make the family a fun place to be and D) freedom to leave – nobody is trapped financially or otherwise.

Outreach Program

Unless your community goal is isolation, and in my opinion even if it is, an outreach program is essential to supporting the energy and growth of your community because it brings new people to your creation to see what it is. The more self-sustainable your community is, the less tangible reasons people will have to travel outside the community; this means you need to either bring the outside world to you or people will most likely leave the community just for something new.

The outreach program we are creating is through dedicating a little more than a third of the community to tourism, designing the recreational activities so they are part of the daily living plan but open to visitors of the community, and founding the individual entrepreneurial model on an internet web presence that introduces people to the community through the individual businesses. This is a three tiered approach but any one of these approaches can be used to support your community, the important part is that you have some sort of outreach program that not only help build your community but also helps to educate the world.

Conclusion:

Sustainable communities planning is becoming more popular every year. People want to start a new life but don’t know how or don’t have the resources. If you are someone like me working to change the current paradigm and set people free, be sure you consider the social aspects of community building. We already have a plethora of disconnected and uncooperative communities called the cities of America – they aren’t working. Let’s start creating something different and move ourselves closer to the sustainable planet we are capable of.

How To Become An Effective Communicator

The ability to speak clearly, eloquently, and effectively has been recognised as the hallmark of an educated person since the beginning of recorded history. Systematic comment on communication goes back at least as far as The Precepts of Kagemni and Ptah-Hopte (3200-2800 B.C.) Under the label ‘rhetoric’, the study of the theory and practice of communication was a central concern of Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance and early modern education. In the United States, rhetorical training has been a part of formal education since Harvard’s founding in 1636. It continues to be important.

Communication is a process of transferring information from one entity to another (Wikipedia).

Everything is Communication

Everything we do has something to do with communication. Often we think it is something that happens when we are talking or listening. We accept that the person hearing the information doesn’t necessarily need to be present (e.g. watching the television or listening on the radio) but we know that for communication to have taken place, something must have happened within the listener. It also has to do with understanding the intent of the person speaking and acceptance of that information or the meaning intended by the speaker.

But communication is more ubiquitous than that. Communication - the passing and receiving of information – happens within us as much as between speakers and listeners. The messages beliefs, values and stories we tell ourselves, about ourselves, is also communication. Our self-concept, what we think we are capable of, the self-talk that fills a busy mind, is all communication. This internal stream of thoughts, particularly if unchecked, confounds our openness to possibilities for change with ourselves as much as with other people. This self-talk also colours our beliefs and expectations of other people. It inhibits our ability to remain open-minded and available to others so that we truly listen and make decisions based on deep understanding or a filtered version of what we anticipate another is saying. The quality of communication also depends on the ability of the speaker to galvanise their thoughts, access sufficient vocabulary, and adapt their message to suit the audience, convey feelings as well as content, and adopt sophisticated skills to investigate social dynamics and potential conflict. Communication is as much relationship building as it is conveying of information. Communication takes place within the context of relationships: relationships with ourselves, with others, with ideologies, with belief systems and in the case of politics, with a nation or globally. So whilst communication between audiences has something to do with understanding the intent of the person speaking and acceptance of that information and its meaning, the context of relationship must always be taken into account for what is not said is as powerful as what is said. It is however, more complex which the following examples indicates.

Communication Example

Two managers work in the same organisation. Brad, a senior planner has called a meeting with Helen, the marketing manager of a medium sized PR company. The purpose of the meeting set out in the email sent is to discuss the timeline needed to launch a new product to their existing customer base. The meeting begins and Brad shares his department’s progress in finalising the product and Helen listens avidly, nodding and adding the appropriate aha’s which Brad assumes indicates that she is impressed or at least understands what he is saying. We might assume from first glance that the outcome of the meeting will be considered a success with the product soon to be launched on the market. If we had the ability to read minds however, we might find that something else is being communicated. Imagine that Helen has a strong attraction to Brad but has never expressed it, believing that workplace romance is unprofessional and probably a recipe for disaster. But alone with Brad in this meeting she finds him irresistible and during his presentation she hasn’t heard a word about the project. She thinks he likes her because the more she nods and expresses understanding, he becomes more animated, laughing and clearly pleased to be in her company. Brad, on the other hand, has a girlfriend, a successful career woman who works long hours. Because he wants to start a family, he has developed an irritation with ambitious young women who even offer to work on the weekend to finish projects. Realising however, that his quarterly performance depends on launching this product, he hides his prejudice and works hard at impressing Helen with his skills – in the boardroom that is, not the bedroom.

This simple example highlights that what is intended is not always what is heard and understood. In order to be effective communicators, we must develop sophisticated skills to check this out. But this is only a part of what makes communication effective and this is why most communication skills training often fails to deliver beyond rudimentary skills development. We must become experts at communicating with ourselves – the intended messages from within that are often hidden and yet sabotage us effectively communicating and achieving the outcomes we want – in the boardroom or the bedroom, and everywhere in-between in fact. These two aspects – inner and outer communication – when refined, create what is known as Calm Communication. This highly sophisticated process of communication is the hallmark of effective leadership and is an essential ingredient in enjoyable and highly satisfying relationships.

The cost of poor communication We only have to look around us to see the fallout of poor communication. Misunderstandings and prejudice between people, broken relationships, divorce, conflict between neighbours, resistance to organisational change, team conflict and potential war between international leaders. The most challenging part is the fallout of people’s needs not being met when they find themselves misunderstood, their message judged or criticised and the overall quality of the interaction seriously compromised. The solution is to understand that effective communication is only possible when the filters are understood and replaced with ways to challenge what we believe we are seeing and hearing with what is actually seen and heard (or intended).

How to become an effective communicator

Learning to communicate is something that naturally happens within the context of our family and socialisation. Innumerable external influences affect the extent to which that process is successful to an individual learning to communicate effectively – with themselves and other people. However, it is as if becoming an effective communicator is left to chance. Apart from having to speak publicly in exams or assessments throughout the process of education, most people learn that their communication could be improved when their relationships fail, conflict occurs with their friends or clients and opportunities are lost. Forward looking organisations invest in communication training but the emphasis on skills training alone produces limited, long-term results. The reason for this is that the person hasn’t changed on the inside. How a person feels about themself and their abilities contributes enormously to their ability to communicate effectively. At a conscious level, they may work hard to improve their confidence, their rapport-making skills and even their ability to have difficult conversations. However, they often find that they attract similar people and the same situations that keep them trapped in similar outcomes and similar relationships. This is because of hidden, unconscious factors that must be addressed or else the same patterns will continue throughout the person’s life – often leaving them bewildered as to why they keep attracting the same outcomes. It is only when skills-training is combined with overcoming and changing their internal dialogue, that a person can truly connect with others and communicate effectively rather than sabotaging their speaking or listening.

Practical ways to improve communication

Whilst learning to be an effective communicator requires a depth of internal change coupled with skills training, there are some things that can be done to immediately improve communication – in the boardroom or the bedroom – and everywhere in-between. When used, these techniques will have a positive impact on all your relationships and go some way to you achieving the results you want in your work and personal life.

1. Keep Expectations in Check Expectations serve to focus our conversations to achieve satisfactory outcomes. When working with others to achieve a goal, they are essential. However, internal expectations of others regarding how they should, ought and must act because they are part of a particular social grouping, interfere with our communication, particularly if we don’t even realise they exist. Assumptions about different social groups, nationalities, Corporate Warriors in certain blue chip companies or generational groupings must constantly be challenged to preserve the uniqueness of individuals. A good rule of thumb is to question your expectations about any group to which a person might belong and remain open-minded to how the individual you are taking to might different from that stereotype.

2. Question everything – yourself included Calm communicators have a default button that ensures they question everything on a regular basis – themselves included. They ask questions of other people to ensure that what they think they have heard is what is intended. They question their reactions and opinions on things to minimise blindspots or prejudices that filter. When they have strong reactions to what other people say, they examine themselves closely, aware that buttons may have been pushed for them. They don’t assume that their strong reactions to things are always because of strong values on a topic; new information may remind them of something or someone to whom they have a strong reaction to in the past. They become aware of their unconscious counter intentions that become apparent through interactions in everyday life and they work to remove them from their lives where they no longer serve them.

3. Share differences and set up regular times to communicate and question In both relationships and teams, a context can be set within which differences can regularly be discussed. If done in an exploratory way, it becomes an opportunity to share different perspectives and clarify misunderstandings. If we only wait until differences somehow interfere with achieving an outcome, then the conversation becomes a difficult one where the stakes are high, opinions differ and emotions are raised. Making time to discuss differences when each are not pressed to get an outcome right away, allows trust to develop in a relationship. Then when crucial conversations occur in the future, there is credit in the bank, allowing differences to be explored without conflict. When recruiting employees, attention is focused on what can or might be able to do. Great lengths are taken to correlate existing abilities and aptitudes against measures of future performance. Personality and team role types are also used to evaluate the likelihood of a person meeting the job requirements and working well within the team. However, cultural and social norms often only become apparent ‘on the job’. If a team culture is developed which encourage discussion of the meanings behind expressed and implicit values and norms, then opportunity exist for innovation and creative ways of solving problems. The same is true when recruiting a partner – becoming a calm communicator allows differences to be examined without threat, ridicule or antagonism.

4. Create new shared meanings - Anyone who has ever been in love experiences a culture of two, each person tuned to each other’s dog whistle that only the other person can hear. Alas, if the relationship ends in tears, those shared meanings somehow don’t seem to coincide. However, what was created in the union was an experience of perceived ‘we-ness’. The likelihood of the relationship continuing and being sustained over time, has a lot to do with the ability of the partners to tolerate differences that previously were not apparent in the honeymoon stage. They still might find their hearts moved by a shared song or mutually enjoyed movie, but for a healthy relationship to develop, each must realise their different identities. Likewise in organisations, the cohesiveness of a team depends on the extent to which the members uphold norms that are important to them as a group. Generational differences make team working challenging when people from different generations are trying to agree on how best to work together. These different expectations of work and life impact enormously on modern day organisational behaviour and together with high turnover and the reality of change and multiple careers over a lifetime, impact on the community which we call work. However, for all teams to work effectively there must develop a sense of ‘we’ which requires a leadership style that encouraged shared meanings that produce productive results and individual and collective satisfaction.

What Is Communication?

Communication is the currency with which we navigate our personal and professional relationships. The difference between good and bad communicators is not based on skills ability alone. When a person has a good relationship with themself and takes full responsibility for their part in creating their outer reality, they are empowered to change and improve their interactions.

By developing a self-questioning mindset that constantly asks ‘What is my part in creating what’s happening here?’ they are empowered to change something about themself rather than hope for circumstances to change or blame others for their experiences. The reason that a high level of self-awareness is essential in effective communication is that there are hidden, unconscious factors that influence our behaviour as much (if not more) than conscious ones.

This is evident when a person realises that they keep attracting similar outcomes in their life and where similar games, dances and dynamics keep playing out in their life which they feel powerless to change. Without changing one’s internal dialogue, challenging the inner saboteur and finding the source of one’s destructive, self-sabotaging behaviour, a person is doomed to get similar outcomes – regardless of whether those outcomes assist them in getting the results they want.

Becoming an effective communicator is only possible when skills-training is combined with a person developing an on-going ability to be self-reflective, take responsibility and in every conversation, see their part in creating the results they get. When these abilities are combined, they directly contribute to a person achieving the relationships they want as well as making them powerful communicators who have impact and influence on others.

 axjdus.gq sippsinfo.cf vsieus.cf vsibus.cf hzgginfo.gq rlsrinfo.gq ikdbus.cf ijgzus.cf burgh.us alaizinfo.gq azxjorg.gq nyatyinfo.cf ioziorg.gq ruezorg.gq digriinfo.cf tovyainfo.cf afajorg.gq edlnorg.ga mvtforg.ga obmborg.ga edejorg.ga ajlnorg.ga rbiiorg.ga echborg.ga rxovorg.ga gazcorg.gq vefcorg.gq knaiorg.ga oeunorg.gq montginfo.ga kevloinfo.ga ikexninfo.ga hddzinfo.ga pekahinfo.ga hbarsinfo.ga cchzinfo.ga zoapcom.ga zddzinfo.gq ejreninfo.gq jncavinfo.gq boousinfo.gq qnnqinfo.gq qezeninfo.gq knnkinfo.gq zhhzinfo.gq uikiinfo.cf scmcainfo.cf bcutzinfo.cf olichinfo.cf ljveorg.ga dfegorg.ga qisqorg.ga towtorg.ga diomcom.ga fzuecom.ga olcgus.ga tzanus.ga ilskus.gq ulrucom.ga uecscom.ga ejclorg.gq zvoborg.gq sazborg.gq ehskcom.ga absolum-guild.com sibgin.cf hndlin.cf gtfain.cf clrrin.cf azxyin.cf eroxin.cf mddoin.cf fmeiin.cf hjaein.cf noqpin.cf hjsqin.cf nayrin.cf yihycom.gq aropin.cf ensain.cf tyydin.cf dimgin.cf waxyin.cf ebppin.cf amvmin.cf ehgcin.cf ebmwus.ga axazus.ga ptwmin.cf wtmecu.cf domucu.cf jicccu.cf oimhcu.cf frugcu.cf gtlocu.cf akeiof.ga dolphin-techtz.com afajorg.gq occcsinfo.cf yirtus.gq gosfus.ga